Graduate Students

Part of my program of research involves training a new generation of feminist researchers to use the theoretical and methodological perspectives offered from within social psychology to make applied contributions to positive social change for women.  The mentorship I provide for students fits within our program area’s larger goals to prepare social scientists to produce applied research on justice-related issues in different cultural, political, and policy contexts, through a variety of research methods.

I have graduated two students under my direct supervision: Rose Grose and Anjali Dutt. NOTE that if you are interested in applying to our program to work with me, I am no longer doing body image research.  Please visit the Research tab to see if we might be a good fit for each other.

Rose Grose

BA: Kalamazoo College
Year entered program: 2009
Year completed program: 2016
Post doc at Emory University in Public Health: 2017
Post doc at Satcher Health Policy Leadership Fellow at the Morehouse School of Medicine: 2018

Current position (2018): Assistant Professor, University of Northern California

Rose's Research Interests while at UCSC

Rose's research program focused on structural and ideological power and inequality, the social construction of gender, and women’s experiences of sexual pleasure across intersections of sexual orientation and ethnicity. Her work heeded the call from feminist psychologists and sexual health scholars to advance the field by taking a contextual, pleasure-centered approach to the study of women’s sexuality and explicitly interrogating power in order to promote sociostructural transformation. She drew on intersectional theories of gender and power, feminist psychological theories, and liberation and empowerment theories to describe how gender-based inequalities within patriarchy create barriers to women’s sexual well-being. She is pursuing a career as a social psychologist conducting rigorous research and applying it to policy change, community action, and education.

Publications while at UCSC

  • Grabe, S., Grose, R., & Dutt, A. (2015). Women’s land ownership and relationship power: A mixed methods approach to understanding structural inequities and violence against women. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 39, 7-19.
  • Grose, R. & Grabe, S. (2014). The explanatory role of relationship power and control in domestic violence against women in Nicaragua: A feminist psychology analysis. Violence Against Women, 20, 972-993.
  • Grose, R. & Grabe, S., Kohfeldt, D. (2013). Sexual education, gender ideology, and youth sexual empowerment.  Journal of Sex Research, 51, 742-753.
  • Grose, R. & Grabe, S. (2014). Sociocultural attitudes surrounding menstruation and alternative menstrual products: The explanatory role of self-objectification. Health Care for Women International. DOI: 10.1080/0739932.2014.888721.
  • Grose, R., Dutt, A., & Grabe, S. (2013).  ‘Power.’ In T. Teo (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology. New York: Springer Publishing Company

Anjali Dutt

BA: The College of New Jersey
Year entered program: 2010
Year completed program: 2016
Visiting Scholar at Macalester College: 2017
Current position (2018): Assistant Professor, University of Cincinnati

Anjali's Research Interests while at UCSC

Anjali's research focused on understanding individuals’ resistance to oppression and efforts to make societies more socially just, particularly in the context of globalization. In one line of research she explored psychological and social mechanisms that are associated with actualizing human rights, specifically by examining the impact of structural changes within communities. In a second line of research she focused on exploring factors that equip individuals with the tools, motivation, and ability to work towards creating social change in their communities. Within both avenues of research she used traditional methods and tools of social psychology (i.e., quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews) to understand individuals’ experiences in different international contexts, with the aim of advancing both psychological knowledge and social justice.

Publications while at UCSC

  • Grabe, S. & Dutt, A. (2015). Counter narratives, the psychology of liberation, and the evolution of a women’s social movement in Nicaragua. Peace & Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology. 21(1), 89-105.
  • Grabe, S., & Grose, R., & Dutt, A. (2015). Women’s land ownership and relationship power: A mixed methods approach to understanding structural inequities and violence against women. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 39, 7-19.
  • Dutt, A., & Grabe, S. (2014). Lifetime activism, marginality, and psychology: Narratives of lifelong feminist activists committed to social change.  Qualitative Psychology, 2, 107-122.
  • Grabe, S., Dutt, A., & Dworkin, S. (2014). Women’s community mobilization and well-being: Local resistance to gendered social inequities in Nicaragua and Tanzania. Journal of Community Psychology, 42, 379-397.
  • Dutt, A., & Grabe, S. (2014). [Review of the book Race, Class and Gender in the United States (9th ed.)]. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 38, 298-303.
  • Dutt, A. & Grabe, S. (2013).  ‘Rights.’ In T. Teo (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology. New York: Springer Publishing Company
  • Grose, R., Dutt, A., & Grabe, S. (2013).  ‘Power.’ In T. Teo (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology. New York: Springer Publishing Company
  • Grabe, S., Dutt, A., & Arenas, C. (forthcoming). Invited chapter: Land tenure and women’s empowerment and health: A programmatic evaluation of structural change in  Nicaragua. In S. Dworkin, M. Gandhi, & P. Passano (Eds.), In Justice and In Health: A New Era in Women’s Health and Empowerment. UC Press.